iSmoothRun: Lapping RunKeeper in the Race for Best Running App

I have been a RunKeeper user basically since I started running regularly back in 2009. I would go so far as to credit the app with helping me go from being winded after a mile to completing 13 marathons and over a hundred other races within the last seven years. But lately things have been going wrong. Very wrong. Every update has been worse than the last. I submitted tickets, I hoped that things would get better, but it got me nowhere. The app crashes more often than it works, the watch app is useless, and the whole experience with the platform has become a big bloated mess. Unfortunately, in light of RunKeeper’s sale to ASICS, it appears to be yet another tech startup being destroyed by its own success.

This all reminded me of a running app I downloaded forever ago but gave little thought to over the years, iSmoothRun. After a month of using it instead of RunKeeper, I have no intention to switch back. This app now occupies the space on my home screen that RunKeeper has had for seven years. With this new app in hand, I can continue to use RunKeeper’s backend service for now as it still functions well enough, but am no longer locked into their increasingly buggy iPhone app.

First of all, the most important feature of iSmoothRun is that it is stable. You would think this is an obvious feature, but somehow it seems to get missed amongst the third or fourth rebranding. I have not had it crash on me yet. Not once. It is not my idea of a good run when I have to stop to take my phone out and troubleshoot why an app is no longer working. iSmoothRun gives me the peace of mind that this won’t happen.

iSmoothRun is easily the most customizable app I have ever used. Not just running app, any app. The device’s main display during a run is completely under your control. Want to see average pace instead of current pace? No problem. Or show both, or neither. There are 11 spaces on the main screen for different stats and none are locked in. If, for some reason, you didn’t want to see time and distance, you can swap them for something else. Pretty much every stat you could imagine is available to you here. The same goes for the Apple Watch display. You pick the stats that are important to you.

iSmoothRun dashboard setup
The setup screen for the dashboard displayed when tracking a run. Every single section is editable.

Perhaps the most important reason I am switching to iSmoothRun is its integration with other services. Pretty much every other running app available is all about getting you locked into their system. So while they may offer some import and export capability, it is never straightforward or simple. iSmoothRun has 16 different integrated services (not counting Facebook, Twitter, Dropbox, or email) and you are free to use as many or as few as you wish. RunKeeper is one of the services and iSmoothRun has virtually 100% compatibility with it. Looking at runs tracked side by side it would be impossible to tell which app was used. It is that good. But because of the extra possibilities I have started exploring additional services. Strava looks to be the most interesting of the group so far. By signing in and enabling export on save, my run is automatically sent to every account I have chosen. No more lock in, no more requesting downloads of my data. This alone is worth switching for, stability aside.

iSmoothRun supported accounts
Supported accounts. The full list does not fit in a single screenshot!

It should also be noted that if you prefer to stay offline, that is fine too. iSmoothRun does not require you to connect to any service, giving you a completely private running log.

There are a few minor issues with iSmoothRun. Currently, the Apple Watch app cannot actually save a run, which means that it does not reflect in the Workout section of the Activity app. The workaround here is to also start the built in Workout app on the watch, but having to enable two apps is not ideal. The developer has stated that this capability has been developed, so hopefully we see it soon. Also, the Watch app does not do a great job of heart rate monitoring, but this looks to be more a watch limitation. A dedicated chest strap for heart rate is a good purchase if you care about that sort of thing (the Wahoo TICKR works very well for me).

iSmoothRun is one of the few paid-up-front, independently developed fitness apps left in the App Store. It is a travesty what the activewear companies who purchased the rest have done to those products. It is clear that they have absolutely no respect for the users. It’s all about branding and marketing, and the products have suffered dearly for it. iSmoothRun is a breath of fresh air. An app that cares about the user experience, that respects you and your data, and that works exactly as promised every time. I cannot recommend it highly enough.

iSmoothRun: Lapping RunKeeper in the Race for Best Running App was last updated May 13th, 2016 by Michael Truskowski