Quiver: Code and Commands

In Part 1 of my series on leaving Evernote I took a look at Google Keep. Part 2 is an app that most people will have no need for, but it ended up being a very useful tool in my day to day work. It is Quiver, a note taking app designed specifically for code.

I actually started using Quiver while I was still using Evernote. While Evernote was an okay place to store code snippets, it wasn’t ideal. Notes are rich text by default, and if you wanted any sort of syntax highlighting, you had to do it by hand. Evernote was not designed with this task in mind.

Quiver is different. Code is its purpose. Yes, it can be made to function as a very nice plaintext note app, but that isn’t the primary purpose. Like Evernote you can create various notebooks, each storing a collection of individual notes. The notes can contain a mix of “cells” that are either rich text, code, markdown, latex, and diagram.

The code cells are the big one for me. Quiver isn’t an IDE, nor is it meant to be. I don’t use it to write any complex scripts or programs. But my job does require me to use a lot of commands, whether it be managing Macs, configuring switches, or setting up servers. I can’t keep it all in my head. Quiver has been extremely valuable for recording and finding these commands. In particular those ones that are used infrequently. I can’t commit them to memory, but I can easily find them in my Quiver library. It provides the answer to those “how did I solve that last time” questions. I also created a few notebooks for my “standard setups”. If I need to quickly spin up a web server, I can open that notebook, follow the commands in order, and end up with a system configured exactly how I want, with all the security settings that are important to not overlook. Yes, I know how to do this in my head, for the most part, but being able to follow a checklist pretty much guarantees I am not accidentally skipping a step.

The only real downside to Quiver right now is that it does not have an iOS component. A beta was announced a while ago, but nothing has come of that yet. Quiver does support sync via Dropbox, iCloud, or Google Drive, so I am able to keep a copy on both my home and work MacBook Pro. I use Dropbox for sync and has been completely reliable. The library can be stored anywhere, so in theory you could set up your own server and sync through it in the event you were syncing sensitive data and would rather not trust a public cloud service.

Given that I rarely do this kind of work on iOS, it isn’t a big deal right now that the iOS version has yet to materialize. It is something to keep in mind if you are regularly using an iPad for this kind of work.

Most people don’t need Quiver, and you could easily use another tool to store code notes. But I like having a tool dedicated to this task. I can very quickly find the commands I am looking for without returning a whole bunch of other unrelated results. If you are a programer, sysadmin, or any job that requires regular use of the command line and / or programming languages, this is a great tool to have in your arsenal.

Quiver: Code and Commands was last updated March 11th, 2017 by Michael Truskowski